Loren Coleman

Loren Coleman

More on Greenwell

Richard Greenwell, who just passed away, reportedly had planned to write a book on cryptozoology, but never did. Few knew that he had co-edited two books. His first was Nutrition, Food, and Man: An Interdisciplinary Perspective by Paul B. Pearson and J. Richard Greenwell (ed), Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1980. The second reflected his interest in ufology, which came before his cryptozoology involvement. It was Sightings: UFOs and the Limits of Science by Ronald Story and J. Richard Greenwell (ed.), NY: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1981, and London: New English Library. A paperbound version was published as well, [...]

Richard Greenwell (1942-2005)

An important figure in formalizing the organizational structure and tenets of cryptozoology, Richard Greenwell, 1942-2005, has died. J. Richard Greenwell, 63, cofounder of the International Society of Cryptozoology (ISC), died Tuesday night, November 1, 2005, shortly before 8 p.m. of cancer. He passed quickly and peacefully while surrounded by family in his home in Tucson, Arizona. On January 8-9, 1982, Greenwell, at the suggestion of Jerome Clark, along with Dr. George Zug at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D. C. and Dr. Roy Mackal at the University of Chicago, embarked on the creation of the first formal scientific organization for [...]

Barnum and Bates

Mark Baard’s article, "America Goes Cryptozoology Crazy," in Wired News certainly was reflected in the Bates Conference and during the month of October. Cryptomundo’s launch, the Texas Bigfoot Conference, Duel Masters’ Bounty Offer and present photo prizes, Weird Travels’ Nessie and Champ program, the Dover Demon Boston television programming, and the Bates Cryptozoology Symposium all occurred in a concentration that fed into each other and the media’s growing national fascination with cryptozoology. One of the positive benefits of the Bates College intellectual gathering was some open sharing between artists outside the mainstream and outside cryptozoology. Their energy, thoughts, and insights [...]

Black Cat is Kitty Cat?

In a breaking news story out of Australia, a Talangi researcher named Bernie Mace (who told the media there that he’s been researching mystery cat reports for thirty years), is quoted as having a new theory. Mace earlier had said the black cat that Melbourne deer hunter Kurt Engel shot in June 2005 was a melanistic puma. Black pumas are unverified in North and South America, let alone in Australia, the United Kingdom, and other reported areas, such as Germany, where they have been sighted. A mystery felids, a black catlike cryptid, nevertheless, is frequently encountered in areas of unknown [...]

Yeti at Bates

Yeti at Home at Bates This weekend’s Bates College Cryptozoology Symposium will bring together artists and cryptozoologists, for the first time, as far as I know, in a credible academic setting. It is the kickoff to the June-October 2006 exhibition, and will have a good schedule of talks on cryptozoology, art, science, creativity, and more. One change in the talks is a cancellation of Rachel Berwick for personal family matters, to be replaced by June O’Neill, discussing The Great New England Sea Serpent. The weekend should be informative and fun. I am also happy to announce that the Museum has [...]